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ENTRY: Rewind to last Spring and the Hypocrisy of the Bruins...

You have to hand it to the Boston Bruins. Despite emphatically stopping the trend of the their long-standing playoff futility with a Stanley Cup win in 2011, they still haven’t forgotten how to find a way to lose against the Canadiens.

Going into their playoff series against the Habs last year, the near unanimous popular sentiment was that the Bruins could not lose…..unless they beat themselves by letting the Canadiens ‘get in their heads’. Easy, no problem. Right?

Not quite apparently. The Bruins, once again, could not get away from their inferiority complex and their need to show the world that they were stronger, tougher, belligerent and of course, persecuted by the referees. Never has a group so intent on holding themselves up as an example of the moral standard of ‘how hockey should be played’ exemplified the exact opposite. Viewed through the bean-colored glasses worn by Bruin-nation, the Canadiens embellish, the Bruins do not, the Canadiens whine, the Bruins do not, the Canadiens cheap shot, the Bruins do not..and the list goes on and on.

Yet history will show that over the duration of the series against the Canadiens, the only whining heard was from Claude Julien lamenting most every call made against his team. It will show a Bruins team more intent on sending a message after the whistle, than playing the game. It will show that the Bruins best offense was delivered by water bottles and snow showers. It will show the so-called epitome of a Bruins warrior, Milan Lucic, spearing players like there is no tomorrow, yet calling his opponent a chicken after delivering a clean hit. It will show that same Lucic single-handedly define the word classless at the end of Game 7.

The hypocrisy is laughable and unfortunately for the Bruins, IT is their defining and long-standing identity.

Talk about the pot calling the kettle black (and gold)…



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